Notice: Undefined property: stdClass::$image_fulltext in /home/indiancountrynew/public_html/plugins/content/social2s/social2s.php on line 1531

Notice: Undefined property: stdClass::$image_intro in /home/indiancountrynew/public_html/plugins/content/social2s/social2s.php on line 1533

Notice: Undefined property: stdClass::$image_fulltext in /home/indiancountrynew/public_html/plugins/content/social2s/social2s.php on line 1531

Notice: Undefined property: stdClass::$image_intro in /home/indiancountrynew/public_html/plugins/content/social2s/social2s.php on line 1533

Officials search for possible Cherokee artifacts

Canton, Georgia (AP) 11-0-7

A company hired by the state Department of Transportation has been searching for artifacts at the site of a highway bridge project, an area believed to once have been occupied by the Cherokee.

Edwards-Pitman is digging through an area off Highway 372 just outside Ball Ground, the site of a future project to replace a bridge over the Etowah River and straighten out a curve.

The research is expected to continue for four months, said Terri Lotti, an archaeologist with the state transportation department. The site is believed to be part of the Cherokee Indians’ Long Swamp Village.

There are about six spots at the site where structures likely once stood, said Garrett Silliman, a field director with Edwards-Pitman. The location of the structures can be identified through staining in the soil caused by the wood used to build the structures.

Pieces of pottery and fragments of stone tools have been found there, he said.

Items found at the site will be taken to a lab for analysis, catalogued and taken to the University of West Georgia to be curated.

“We are going to get as much information from the site as we can,” Lotti said. “Hopefully, we will get some good information that will define their culture and prehistory.’

The Long Swamp Village is one of the biggest American Indian villages in the county along with Hickory Log and Sixes, said Stefanie Joyner, executive director of the Cherokee County Historical Society.

It also is in the area where the Battle of Taliwa, which was fought between the Cherokee and Creek, is believed to have happened. The Cherokee defeated their rivals and that led to the expulsion of the Creek from much of north Georgia.

“Anything they discover will help us learn about the lifestyle and their community,” Joyner said. “It is one thing to say that Indians lived in Cherokee. It is another to pull up beads that were worn or instruments that were used by them. It makes them more real.”

Information from: The Cherokee Tribune,
http://www.cherokeetribune.com/
0
0
0